alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Kindred Rites)
Over at Deborah J. Ross's blog, nice things are being said about several books. Spiral Path was one of those books.

In the meantime, the water demons have convinced the air demons to help smother or push out the fire elemental running the pilot light. My cat is very unhappy and wants me to eat a larger breakfast....
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Kindred Rites)
Sleeping Hedgehog is an on-line journal that talks about wonderful arts, often books, that may have a pagan touch. It's the sister publication to Green Man Review. I am delighted that the books were well-received.

"“…once in a very great while I find something I wish I’d read thirty years before it was ever published.”

“…These books do not let you rest. Allie is constantly in heart-thumping danger, being tested by benevolent and evil forces, by her human teachers, by human enemies, and by adult-sized moral questions, though she begins at age eleven. The pioneer setting simply takes it for granted that everyone, of every age, must meet every challenge as it comes with whatever tools they have”


This was on all three Night Calls books.
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Mascot)
One of [livejournal.com profile] sartorias's fans has taken to checking out books that Sherwood has enjoyed. She tried Night Calls and Kindred Rites, and has enjoyed her visit to Allie's world. I am always amused by people who think of the book as Little House on the Prairie with magic. I have to confess--I simply read tons of period books, books about period, and pulled what intrigued me. I was inspired to find out what the women in Manly Wade Wellman's works were thinking about. I also got into Anne of Green Gables as an adult. But other than a few episodes of the TV show, I still haven't gotten around to Little House. I guess I need to read at least the first book.

Over at the blog Dead Houseplants (at a guess, she's much too busy to keep them alive!) the author talks about what she found fun in the first two books. And although I am humbled and sure I am way out of my league with my idol Austen, it's a fun comparison.

"I like frontier America as a fantasy setting: there are so many possibilities to explore. I really enjoyed Patricia C. Wrede's Thirteenth Child series: it's big and adventurous with grand, sparkling magic and fantastic dangerous beasts. Night Calls is the Jane Austen version: it's cozy and quiet with creepy dark demons (okay, pretty sure there were no demons in Jane Austen; ditto werewolves, vampires and witches. But I stand by the comparison.) Kimbriel is all about the characters—great, vivid characters!—and their relationships, about towns and how they function, about families. One of the early dramatic moments is Alfreda's confrontation with the minister about having a service for dead werewolves. It's a credit to Kimbriel's writing that this scene is just as gripping (if a tad less scary) than a later confrontation with a vampire."

I'm glad Kim enjoyed the books, and hope she likes Spiral Path, too. (And the third incarnation of the Night Calls cover.) Also--the Night Calls magic is going to get splashier. I just felt that a child transitioning to adult needed a little time to grow....

Kimbriel-NightCalls300x200
alfreda89: (Books and lovers)
I have noticed a flurry of (mostly happy) reviews for Night Calls, Kindred Rites, and even four for the latest, Spiral Path. Thank you, everyone who has taken a moment to write a review at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Goodreads, Powells--anywhere reviewing happens.

Writers try not to nag about reviews, but I can tell you that a stack of fan letters is what made the entire series of the Atevi stretch from three books into its current number. Because thoughtful, happy fans let people know they love a book, more books happen. My agent can't show up with a stack of fan letters, but editors can and do check a writer's back list to see how fans are responding to a story. They check places like Amazon.

I hope to write a fourth Alfreda novel some day, along with a bunch of other books. Your writing a short, thoughtful review helps prove that there's a demand for my work. It doesn't have to be huge, you don't have to recap the story. My favorite review remains a snip from a review for Kindred Rites, that actually mentions an incident in Night Calls. HappyBookWorm wrote:

"...Parts of her books are genuinely creepy. I don't think I'll ever look at a loose post in a field the same way - much less disturb one!"

There were a couple more lines, but this says it all, in a special way. If you want to share Allie with more people, a good review always helps.

For those of you waiting for me to write something else? I've started something else. ;) But whether you are reviewing my Night Calls books or my Nuala books, thank you.

You are helping!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Mascot)
It's always a relief when a very visible reviewer likes your books. I have the job right now of trying hard to gain readers for Night Calls, which was mishandled by New York publishing. (In hindsight I wish we'd sold it to Laura Anne Gilman at Ace, but that may be about the time she left for ROC--the problems of my memory since Life, Interrupted.) When you bring something out with a smaller press, it's a crap shoot whether anyone will talk about the book.

But friends and fans (and fans who are friends) do talk about the book, and slowly, reviewers take note, and people start finding the book. Over at The Bookpushers, E-booklover gives Night Calls her seal of approval. She also has a nice collection of links, much like my gone and lamented Backlist eBooks did, to multiple venues where the book can be found.

"Life happened to get in my reading way so I didn’t manage to read Night Calls until after the New Year when I was dealing with the post holiday slump. After I finished reading it I knew three different things. First, I really hoped she Kimbriel was writing more Alfreda stories. Second, I HAD to review this and spread the word. And finally Gilman gives good book recs."

Yes, there are more Alfreda books--Kindred Rites is in ebook, and coming in print as soon as CreateSpace stops messing with us. Laura Anne Gilman does give great book recs (and writes wonderful books, too!) I'm sorry the web site isn't up to date, but I have been debating moving it, or overhauling the code engine completely--and that takes time. (You see why I so miss Backlist eBooks?) Also, with everything else going on, it's update or finish writing Spiral Path, the third Allie book.

You choose. Write, website, or find a job. Pick two. Guess what I chose? ;^) But I hope to get to it soon--I kept the Backlist eBooks code!

Kimbriel-NightCalls300x200
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Night Calls)
As part of my climb back into publishing, there will be a Night Calls POD. To get it out faster, I'm working with a friend who can format more quickly than I can. This means I won't have her system to add later reviews easily.

So if you have spotted a good review that you want to be sure I've seen, or authors, if you want to add your two cents about Night Calls? Now's the time. Let me know today if you can!

Seventeen years of reviews actually filled the Amazon text box. Good heavens. #FeelingBlessed

For more choices...

After first harvest, it's back to the Audible list and an editing job.

Work, work.
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Night Calls)
I'm collecting Night Calls reviews for the POD, so here are a few more.

Shiny Book Reviews still likes my work--they gave Night Calls an A+ review!

"So there’s the value of hard work. There’s the value of personal sacrifice. There’s the value of human dignity. There’s a good deal about religion and spirituality, discussed in a quiet, calm way that I found particularly appealing. And there’s a rousing action-adventure going on throughout that makes you forget about all of the above until the book is over and you start thinking about how wonderful it all was before you turn back to read it all over again.

Bottom line? NIGHT CALLS is excellent. Truly, truly excellent. It’s a can’t-miss novel with heart, style and wit that will please all ages. Guaranteed.

Grade: A-plus."


And writer Rebecca McFarland Kyle, who is an Amazon.com Top 500 Reviewer, was kind enough to give Night Calls 5 stars.
Read more... )
Anyone find any that I've missed? My POD window is running out.
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Night Calls)
Honestly, I'm so excited I must sound like Seanan McGuire, so please forgive--I was hoping to attract some good library reviews for Night Calls, and thanks to Abe Books, I have discovered that they reviewed Night Calls when it first came out from HarperPrism, back in the day. Abe Books had a snip up:

"The underlying horror...builds slowly and inexorably to an exciting climax. Nordic superstitions and spirits combined with unusual ways to combat the supernatural make this a unique read for horror fans."

Rochelle M. Bilz, Voya, October 1996


Here's hoping it is accurate, so I can use it for the POD cover.

Wheeee!

I think I need to hit the library in search of back issues of VOYA and Locus. There might be some good Kindred Rites reviews out there, in the mists of time. We now return to regular life!

http://bit.ly/NightCalls
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fireworks)
...when the writer liked the books!

Fires of Nuala

"...a complex, engrossing tale that encapsulates SF, romance, & mystery into the best book I've read in 2013" | http://amzn.to/1dkDbjR

Hidden Fires

"Hidden Fires is an outstanding SF novel, but it's also an excellent romance that...has a mystery component" | http://amzn.to/19VkMZq

Fire Sanctuary

"Every SF fan out there should read Fire Sanctuary. Every single last one." | http://amzn.to/1445Zna

Thank you, Barb! I'm glad you liked them!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fires of Nuala book cover)
A thoughtful review of Fires of Nuala has appeared over at Amazing Stories Magazine online.

Keith West liked it!

"This is a book that should appeal to both male and female readers. There’s action, intrigue, and politics to appeal to fans of sf thrillers, while the relationship between Darame and Sheel will be a plus to those who like their fiction with a dash of romance. While men typically prefer the former and women the latter, the truth is that most normal, healthy adults have aspects of both in their personalities albeit to different degrees. The amazing thing is that Kimbriel manages to balance both so that the joining of the two, action and romance, is nearly seamless. Many have tried to pull this sort of book off in the past, but few have succeeded. Kimbriel makes it look easy. She hasn’t written a book for men or a book for women. She’s written a book for mature, intelligent adults who like thoughtful science fiction with action, intrigue, and fully realized characters the reader wants to spend time with."

If you haven't checked out Amazing Stories Magazine online yet, this is a great excuse to stop by and check it out!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Default)
This is a great book for a veteran, especially if you are blessed with a WWII vet who is still lively and reading -- he might enjoy this one. Here's my recent Goodreads Review:

See YASee YA by Cheryl Kerr

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This beautiful little book is about fathers, daughters and sons, about military families, about balancing the letter of law and moral law. This is a story about love, regret and atonement. It's a mystery and a family saga, a trip through time and space, taking us from the modern day back to World War Two. It's a novel about choices, about being afraid to face the truth -- and about closing a door, for good or ill, and moving on.

It's a story about hope, and the power of love carried past death.

I've already read it several times. If any of these things strikes a chord with you, I highly recommend See Ya. It's lovingly written, and belongs on your shelf. I can't begin to choose a passage to quote -- it's woven like a summer haze, a dream you will wake reluctantly from. Give it a try. I don't think you'll regret the journey.

View all my reviews
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Default)
Here's the link!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fires of Nuala book cover)
For Fires of Nuala. Happiness!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fires of Nuala book cover)
Thank you, [livejournal.com profile] 6_penny!

Whee!

Dec. 8th, 2011 09:52 pm
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fires of Nuala book cover)
Just noticed that one person did reviews for all three Nuala books! Let's hear it for re-purposing material!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fires of Nuala book cover)
Thank-you, Antonia and Troyce!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fires of Nuala book cover)
Thank you, A!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Fire Sanctuary e-cover)
A new review showed up at Amazon while I was out of town. So kind, that someone took a moment out of their busy life to do that. If I could get the reviews of the Nuala books up to twenty for each, they'd show up in searches more often.

Can't do anything about it so I'll go post a review at Goodreads. And check to make sure the book is over twenty reviews at Amazon.

Spreading happiness!
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Default)
The House on Durrow StreetThe House on Durrow Street by Galen M. Beckett

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

More thick, chewy fantasy )
alfreda89: 3 foot concrete Medieval style gargoyle with author's hand resting on its head. (Default)
A new urban fantasy by [livejournal.com profile] suricattus requires dropping everything else, once I get my hands on it. And joy, it was worth the wait!

Pack of Lies (Paranormal Scene Investigations, #2)Pack of Lies by Laura Anne Gilman

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


Pack of Lies is the second of the Paranormal Scene Investigations, as the publisher calls the urban fantasies about Bonita Torres, Talent (that’s a human magic-user to you) and now a PUPI, a Private Unaffiliated Paranormal Investigator. That unaffiliated part is important, because Bonnie, her team mates and two bosses are trying to create something that has never existed before – people who evaluate the Facts of a magic crime, taking no side.

Eight months into this grand experiment, there are a few people who grudgingly admit their skills might be useful, people (and I use the word loosely) who are deeply suspicious of the idea, and people who bitterly appose their venture and are doing everything they can to undermine it.

In this novel, what appears to be an open and shut case of an attack upon a fatae (non-human, thinking, magical creature) and his human, Talented companion is not only not simple, it may be related to a slow simmer of bigotry bubbling up in the stew of magic-users. The human Council (heavy hitters who follow certain laws and regs) distrusts the lonejacks (the independent magic-users,) the purebloods are suspicious of the part-bloods and mixed-bloods, and the fatae suspect the humans are out to exterminate them – and a few probably are. Gilman does an excellent job of introducing all these concepts, never interrupting the flow of the story.

This is not a shoot-em-up fantasy racing along at a breakneck pace. Gilman uses multiple POVs, some only to introduce new, key players in the game. There is a lot of introspection and stream-of-consciousness – possibly too much for people who want the plot to move, who want to know where the potential romances are going, who expect to rip through a book a day in their quest for Another Good Story. You’re going to get a very good story here, but although it does not lag at all, it is, well, thick in spots. Characterization is intricate, and on one level the reader will realize what is going on before the characters do. Old tropes are used in new ways, with new intensity or with a light touch that makes this New York City a unique place on the fantasy scene.

This book is not as violent as the Retriever books tended to be, although it is as dark in its own way. Bonnie and her cohorts are all twenty-somethings, and the things they learn about magic, and about human nature, hit with force because the first lessons are often the hardest.

If you enjoy the CSI style of story, if you like urban fantasy, if you like strong characterization, chances are you’ll like this book. Don’t read it as a straight romance (although a strong attraction is being fought in here) and don’t expect the crime to be tied up in a bow. Nothing is that simple in a Gilman novel, and her fans wouldn’t have it any other way.




View all my reviews

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
202122232425 26
2728293031  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Sep. 22nd, 2017 12:59 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios